Claude Hector

1925 (?) Tourcoing -

Picture of Claude Hector
Picture of Claude Hector
Tosca
Martha
Picture of Claude Hector
Hector first studied singing at the Tourcoing's Conservatory with M. Wibaut. He moved to Paris in 1945, where he studied at the National Conservatory with Mme Monsy-Franz and von Gabriel Dubois.

In 1949, he made his debut at La Monnaie, where he stayed until 1954. There in 1952 he created Tom Rakewell in the French premiere of The Rake's Progress.

He had a guest contract with the Opéra-Comique since 1952. He sang at the Paris Opéra during 1954/5 (Debut Faust (April 26 1954), Les Indes Galantes (Valère, 1954), Die Zauberflöte (Priest), Lohengrin (1955), Bolivar (Le Visitador, Dominguez), Numance (Local premiere on April 15, 1955 as Morandre with Sarocca, Gorr, Couderc, Blanc, Bianco, Giraudeau, Depraz, Massard, Vanzo, Charles-Paul, Serkoyan, Soix, Finel, Max-Conti with Fourestier conducting).

After he decided to concentrate on the German repertory. He studied again for this repertory.

His career evolved as follows:
1959-60 Opernhaus in Essen
1960-63 Stadttheater Bern
1963-68 Opernhaus in Graz

In Graz he took part in the Austrian premiere of Il Prigioniero (1963), L'Ange de Feu (1963), Doktor Faust (1965). He left Graz in 1968 after singing Siegmund.

His repertory included: Radames, Otello, Turiddu, Canio, Pinkerton, José, Samson, Orest (Iphigénie en Tauride), Florestan, Erik, Walther, Lohengrin, Tristan, Loge, Siegmund, Parsifal, Bacchus, Kaiser, Herodes, Ägisth, Alwa, Alfred, Schuisky, Kobus, ...

He moved to Dortmund where his wife the well known soprano Elisabeth Lachmann (1940) sang at the local Opera House since 1968.
Reference: Kutsch & Riemens

Claude Hector (as Kobus) sings La route d'Emeraude: Finale Act 2, with Huberte Vecrey (as Francesca)
16 Sept.1923 -Membach 3 July 2009
1950, conducted by Maurice Bastin
I wish to thank Christian Torrent for the recording and pictures (top 2).
La route d'Emeraude by Julianus Marie August de Boeck (Merchtem, Belgium, May 9, 1865 – Merchtem, October 9, 1937)

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